Preparing For Fall Facilitator Visit

The following are a few tips to allay anxiety, concern, and apprehension of your facilitator’s home visit with you. (Click on the links for more.)

  • Conference with your spouse - and children if appropriate - concerning the goals, planning, and overall vision for each child’s year. Write it down in order to refer to it when your facilitator comes. Keep it simple and to the point.
  • Review previous assessments (ie: Spring 2006) and education plans in order to reflect and evaluate ‘where we’ve been’, ‘how we’re doing’, and ‘where we’re going’. Some parents have even filled out the new assessment right on the previous form. If you are new with WISDOM or have misplaced the previous assessment, view education plan samples and the blank assessment form.
  • E-mail or call your facilitator within a reasonable time frame prior to the visit for special requests, concerns, scheduling preferences, or anything that will assist the facilitator in making the most of the visit for all involved. If you do not know who your facilitator is, please contact the WISDOM Office to find out.
  • Make samples of the children’s work available for your facilitator’s perusal.
  • If possible, have a preliminary written draft of each child’s education plan.
  • Pray for God’s guidance and for the effective use of the limited time available with your facilitator. We’re praying for you, too.
  • Enjoy your facilitator visit, and the start of your new year of study!

When I look back on my years of home schooling through high school, I am sure that I will have many fond memories of WISDOM’s Online Courses. Since the autumn of 2003, I have taken seven online courses, all of which were profitable. I take one every season – In fact, one season I took three at the same time! My plans are to continue into my eighth course in the upcoming school year. I do not wish to stop!

I was not sure that I would feel this way when I first signed up for a course three years ago. This was the “Introductory Great Books” course. When I looked at the reading list initially, I was uncertain as to whether I could manage the weekly reading assignments, or discuss them adequately. After all, books such as the “Iliad”, the “Aeniad”, and, at that time, “War and Peace”, can seem rather intimidating to a nearly-thirteen-year-old! I thought that the conversation might be over my head, especially as there were students in the class several years older than me. However, encouraged by my parents, and made hopeful by seeing that such favourite authors of mine as Shakespeare, C.S. Lewis, and J.R.R. Tolkien were on the list, I took a deep breath and signed up for the course.

Marriage has taken a beating, and it has more than a bleeding nose.

We have all known of marriages that seemed doomed from the beginning, and sure enough didn’t survive the test of time. But something has changed. Many strong and healthy mar-riages that have been an example to others have collapsed. Christian matrimony has not been immune to attack. What is going on and why now more than ever?

Committed couples are suffering the same difficulties that are afflicting our world. As Christians, we may think ourselves separated from present culture, but we are ill affected, aware of it or not. We are living in a world where pleasure, entertainment, and the avoidance of suffering are top bill. Man is at the center of this worldly culture. We live in the “disposable society”. Cultural forces and destructive spirits have the marital camp surrounded. But isn’t the devout Christian immune? Doesn’t faith insulate us and protect us?

Often, history education consists of a short study of ancient history and several years of study about the time since the discovery of the Americas. There is so much information about the last 500 years that the sheer volume overwhelms earlier history. This emphasis is what most of us of the last generation experienced in our schooling.

There is a danger in this. We begin to think that the time before 1492 is in the same realm as myths and legends. Biblical stories, and perhaps Christ himself, are not seen as historically true. But if we have a more complete picture of history, preferably chronologically from the oldest known civilizations, we can see how God prepared the world for His coming, and how mankind responded. His Incarnation can be seen for what it is: the central event of all history.

The power or capacity of causing an effect in indirect or intangible ways. (Webster’s Dictionary)

My first thoughts seem to be on the negative forms of influence. For example, when I am a stumbling block to my children because of my bad habits and failings I have a negative effect on them or when a moodiness creeps in on one child’s attitude it can influence the attitudes of the others.

So how do I nurture the capacity of causing a positive effect on my family and they for each other? Doesn’t it simply boil down to ‘right living’? When I fall isn’t the best witness to pick myself up, to acknowledge my failing to myself and others, to ask forgiveness and carry on? Isn’t it to teach my family, using words only when necessary, generosity, a warm heart and a spirit of service; and doesn’t this course of action produce peace and joy? Don’t peace and joy profoundly influence the world around us?

I know these things, yet I need to read an action plan to myself at the beginning of the day, the middle of the day and at the end of the day that each moment must be deeply lived for the glory of God and that I am responsible for leading (not pushing or cajoling) my family into that understanding.

In the final analysis doesn’t this translate into the fact that, it’s NOT all about me?

I’ll need to thank Ken for continually reminding us of the JOY theory: Jesus first, Others second, Yourself third. Marlane, are you putting yourself second, or worse yet first? So, if we do first things first all will fall into to place and I won’t need to worry about whether I am being a good influence on my family and the world around me.

The desire of my heart is to encourage families with grace and love. I do pray and hope that the attached article will bring encouragement to you and other home schooling families.

Building strong families together in Christ,
Karen Dargatz

(780) 962-3727

kyra4 “It’s not fair! I’m so lonely, and I’m stuck at home instead of in school!”

“I’m just curious to see if I could make it—if I could do the work, and fit in with the school kids.”

“High school is an important time to see how I fit in with the world!”

“How can I be a witness to others if I’m home schooled? You should let me go to school where I can help others.”

“You don’t know how I feel about this. It’s really important to me, and I know it’s what I should be doing—it’s what I want!”

Sound familiar?

Looking back with a bit of perspective and clarity, I thank the Lord for His grace and mercy. My home schooling journey began as something we needed to do, something I didn’t feel qualified to do and something I didn’t really want to do. (Ken was the impetus behind it - so I could say he made me do it.)

As we began in the middle of the academic year, we literally ‘brought school home’ including the texts that TobyLauren had been using. (I believe bringing the texts home was a comfort to the superintendent, principal, and teachers who thought we were rather extreme people.) I ‘taught’ Miss TobyLauren in a rather barren manner and her only consolation was that she could teach her 4-year-old brother in a much more noble fashion.......

ken marlane It was with the support of their local school principal that Ken and Marlane Noster brought home their eldest child, half way through grade 3. The superintendent threatened to charge them with truancy. The late 80’s were rife with inconsistencies in treatment of home schoolers.

In response to the first Alberta Home Education Regulation of 1989, Ken was invited to help a school board develop its program for administrating home schooling. He and Marlane began to pray for an answer to two burning questions: how can a board designed to administrate schools administrate home schooling? and what am I being called to do?

with sistersOnce upon a time in the not too distant past, there was a home schooling family.

Pa worked, and Ma stayed at home, teaching their five children. They had begun their home school adventure much like many other families, merely bringing school home...